Kirsten Bell

PhD (James Cook University)
Honorary Associate, University of British Columbia
PopAnth Author

Kirsten is Professor of Social Anthropology in the Centre for Research in Evolutionary, Social and Inter-Disciplinary Anthropology (CRESIDA) at the University of Roehampton in the UK. She has previously held academic appointments in anthropology departments at the University of British Columbia in Canada, Macquarie University in Australia and the University of Northern Colorado in the USA. She completed a PhD in social anthropology in 2000 at James Cook University, Australia, based on fieldwork on a new religious movement in South Korea. However, for the past decade Kirsten has worked on the anthropology of public health—the focus of her book Health and Other Unassailable Values: Reconfigurations of Health, Evidence and Ethics (Routledge 2017). This subject matter bears little relationship to the pieces she has written for PopAnth, primarily because writing blog articles in those areas would feel WAY too much like work.


Bibliography

Health and Other Unassailable Values sets out to examine health as a core cultural value. Taking ‘health’, ‘evidence’ and ‘ethics’ as her primary themes, Bell explores the edifice that underpins contemporary conceptions of health and the transformations in how we understand it, assess it and enact it. Although health, evidence and ethics have always been important values, …



PopAnth Articles

The (il)logic of tipping

The (il)logic of tipping

"When am I supposed to tip"? While the answer seems obvious for people who are from tipping cultures, foreigners often find the tipping system illogical. Bell explains why.Read on »


Silent but deadly

Silent but deadly

Around the world, farts incite hostility, laughter, and embarrassment. Why? Is it the foul odor, the explosive sounds, the suggestion of shit? A cross-cultural exploration of breaking wind.Read on »


Must love dogs

Must love dogs

Love dogs? In Vancouver, you may have little choice. In this canine-crazy city, pooch parlours reign supreme, dogs slobber over food in supermarkets, and they are even allowed in the doctor's surgery. It's not just a matter of personal preference, it's a culture.Read on »