Keith Hart

Ph.D (St John's College, Cambridge)
Emeritus Professor, Goldsmiths, University of London
PopAnth Community Advisor

Keith Hart co-directs the Human Economy Program at the University of Pretoria and is Professor of Anthropology Emeritus at Goldsmith's, University of London. He founded the Open Anthropology Cooperative and has long been committed to bringing anthropology to the public. He has taught at numerous universities in four continents, most significantly at Cambridge where he was director of the African Studies Centre. His main research has been on Africa and the African diaspora. He has contributed the concept of the informal economy to development studies and has published widely on economic anthropology, especially on money. He lives in Paris with his family and has also worked as a journalist, consultant, publisher and gambler.


Bibliography

West Africa's agriculture has, for 150 years, been heavily geared toward export, yet the region is one of the world's poorest. Keith Hart examines this question, focusing particularly on how this situation has affected the indigenous peoples of West Africa. Commerce has grown impressively, but productivity remains low and capital accumulation is retarded. The reasons exist primarily in internal …


A thorough examination of currency and its relationship to geopolitics, economic position, and the internet. This is an interesting study of money and the distribution of power and wealth.


"It's not personal; it's just business," says the professional killer to his victim. But business is always personal, and even though modern business corporations have been granted the legal status of persons, they are still part of the impersonal engines of society that operate far beyond human reach.

Keith Hart explores in his thought-provoking pamphlet The Hitman's Dilemma …


Karl Polanyi's 1944 book, The Great Transformation, offered a radical critique of how the market system has affected society and humanity since the industrial revolution. This volume brings together contributions from distinguished scholars in economic anthropology, sociology and political economy to consider Polanyi's theories in the light of circumstances today, when the relationship between …


The global financial crisis has renewed concern about whether capitalist markets are the best way of organizing economic life. Would it not be better if we were to treat the economy as something made and remade by people themselves, rather than as an impersonal machine?

The object of a human economy is the reproduction of human beings and of whatever sustains life in general. Such …


This book is a new introduction to the history and practice of economic anthropology by two leading authors in the field. They show that anthropologists have contributed to understanding the three great questions of modern economic history: development, socialism and one-world capitalism. In doing so, they connect economic anthropology to its roots in Western philosophy, social theory and world …