Erin B. Taylor

Ph.D. (University of Sydney)
Post Doctoral Research Fellow, Instituto de Ciências Sociais, University of Lisbon
Research Fellow, Digital Ethnography Research Centre
PopAnth Author, Editor, Founding Member

Erin is PopAnth's Managing Editor. She is currently living in Lisbon, Portugal, where she has a full-time research position at the Instituto de Ciências Sociais (ICS). Erin received her PhD in cultural anthropology from the University of Sydney, Australia, in June 2009. She conducted her fieldwork in a squatter settlement in Santo Domingo, writing on the relationship between poverty and residents’ use of material things, including the houses and communities in which they live. This research resulted in the book Materializing Poverty: How the Poor Transform their Lives (2013, AltaMira). Apart from being an editor and author for PopAnth, Erin blogs regularly on her website.


Bibliography

Poverty is generally defined as a lack of material resources. However, the relationships that poor people have with their possessions are not just about deprivation. Material things play a positive role in the lives of poor people: they help people to build social relationships, address inequalities, and fulfill emotional needs. In Materializing …


What is it really like to do fieldwork? Answers to this question are as diverse as the researchers and the field sites they choose. Anthropologists no longer fit the stereotype of white Westerners going to exotic places to study people very different from themselves. Rather, anthropologists now come from a variety of backgrounds, and their identities are complicated, even to them. This book …


"Local Lives" contests dominant trends in migration theory, demonstrating that many migrant identities have not become entirely diasporic or cosmopolitan, but remain equally focused on emplaced belonging and the anxieties of being uprooted. By addressing the question of how migrants legally and symbolically lay claim to owning and belonging to place, it refocuses our attention on the …


Archaeologists and anthropologists have long studied artifacts of refuse from the distant past as a portal into ancient civilizations, but examining what we throw away today tells a story in real time and becomes an important and useful tool for academic study. Trash is studied by behavioral scientists who use data com­piled from the exploration of dumpsters to better understand our modern …


"With all entries followed by cross-references and further reading lists, this current resource is ideal for high school and college students looking for connecting ideas and additional sources on them. The work brings together the many facets of global studies into a solid reference tool and will help those developing and articulating an ideological perspective." — Library …



PopAnth Articles

Crossing the sexes with friendship

Crossing the sexes with friendship

Cross-sex friendships can be stressful if society views them with suspicion. But some individuals vastly prefer them to same-sex friendships. How can we stop standing in the way of other people's happiness?Read on »


What do the things you carry say about you?

What do the things you carry say about you?

Ask someone to tip the contents of their bags onto the table. What do you see? The results can be surprising. The things people carry say a lot about their society and culture, as well as their finances and personal preferences.Read on »


Calm down and cheer up

Calm down and cheer up

Why do we say that we 'feel up' when we feel happy, but when we are sad we 'feel down'? Metaphors we live by.Read on »


Alone in the city

Alone in the city

People: can't live with them, can't taser them. How do you create personal space in the city?Read on »


Greed is good

Greed is good

Don't bother feeling guilty, your mass consumption at Christmas is part of what makes you a moral person. Why greed is good for humanity in all times and places.Read on »


Humans of SoCal's wineries

Humans of SoCal's wineries

Studying the wine industry seems like a sweet job. But anthropologist Kevin Yelvington went beyond wine tasting and worked alongside labourers in the vineyards. What did he discover?Read on »


If the home team always wins, is it really sport?

If the home team always wins, is it really sport?

Cricket in the Trobriand Islands is different. There's no limit to how many people can be in a team, players dress up in traditional costume, and the home team always wins. So, is it really a sport?Read on »


Missionaries, mercenaries, and misfits

Missionaries, mercenaries, and misfits

According to one Catholic priest, foreigners in Haiti can be classified into three types: missionaries, mercenaries, and misfits. Whether you come to Haiti with good or bad intentions, the end result is often the same: trouble.Read on »


PopAnth Reviews

Swimming with Sharks

Swimming with Sharks

In 2011, anthropologist and journalist Joris Luyendijk embarked upon a quest to find out why people were so apathetic about the 2008 global financial crisis. Was it that people were indifferent? Or was the financial system simply too complicated for people to understand?Read on »


Watching the English

Watching the English

The cultural bases of curious English behaviours, such as their obsession with the weather, their talent for queuing, why they invented so many games, and how their social class system is maintained.Read on »


The Comfort of Things

The Comfort of Things

In this age of mass consumption and global trade, we have an amazing personal freedom to choose — but our choices are still always social acts.Read on »


Fool's Gold

Fool's Gold

Is Wall Street motivated solely by greed, or do its bankers have humanity's interests at heart?Read on »


How to Be Irish

How to Be Irish

Is being Irish really all about shamrocks, drinking fifteen pints of Guinness and telling tall tales? A review of David Slattery's comedic, yet culturally nuanced, account of life in the Emerald Isles.Read on »


Debt

Debt

Do we really have a moral obligation to pay our debts? According to anthropologist David Graeber, the answer to this question is a resounding 'no.'Read on »


The World Until Yesterday

The World Until Yesterday

Modern life has brought many benefits to humanity as a result of discoveries in medicine and technology. But do we do everything better than our ancestors who lived in tiny groups?Read on »


PopAnth Multimedia

Archaeology from space

Archaeology from space

Sarah Parcak describes how her team used satellite data to find an ancient Egyptian city that has been missing for thousands of years. It was ancient Egypt's capital and was a centre of art, architecture and religion.Read on »


The brain in love

The brain in love

Forget your heart — it's your brain that takes you to the heights of romantic love and causes you to crash when it fails. In this TED talk, Helen Fisher describes what happens inside our brain when we are in love.Read on »